About

vantage [van-tij, vahn-]  -noun

1. a position, condition, or place affording some advantage or a commanding view.

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Videovantage is a web resource devoted to video and the high-end video projection industry.  These articles and reviews are all from the personal perspective of the author Mark Petersen and do not represent viewpoints or perspectives from the companies or organizations that Mark is affiliated with.  If you have any comments, questions or concerns about anything posted, please do not hesitate to e-mail me at mark@videovantage.com

Mark Petersen is an avid enthusiast in the video, home theater and video projection industry.  Mark has over 25 years of engineering experience covering many industries and disciplines.  He has worked for small start-ups and has managed teams of over 30 engineers at large fortune 500 engineering companies.  Mark is currently working as a Principal Software Engineer for a promising start-up company involved in video encoding, Internet streaming and the video broadcast industry.  Previously he worked as a VP of Software for a pioneering wireless start-up company that provided an end-to-end, mobile TV system to fans attending large, high-profile, sporting events.  These events included:  The US Open of Tennis, The US Open of Golf, Ryder Cup, PGA Championship, IRL Racing, NFL, NHL and many other events and trials.  In most cases, these were the first use of mobile TV at these events.  Mark’s first engineering experience with video was as a firmware engineer developing software for Hughes-JVC ILA projectors.  These expensive, high-end projectors provided some of the best images at the time and one projector (the ILA 12K) is generally regarded as being the industries first Digital Cinema projector.  Mark is a member of SMPTE and SID.

Videophile

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A videophile (literally, “one who loves sight”) is one who is concerned with achieving high-quality results in the recording and playback of movies, TV programs, etc.

Similar to audiophile values, videophile values may be applied at all stages of the chain: the initial audio-visual recording, the production process, and the playback (usually in a home setting). As with audiophiles, videophiles are generally criticised with being able to recognize differences that are usually imperceptible to most other people; however, video has many more objective ways to measure quality (though one’s opinion over what is more favorable can vary), expanding the range of debate substantially.

Some of the aspects of video that most videophiles are concerned with include frame rate, field frequency, color system, resolution, compression artifacts, motion artifacts, video noise, screen size etc.

The term “videophile” was popularized, if not coined, by Tallahasee, Florida-based attorney and writer Jim Lowe, editor and publisher of “The Videophile’s Newsletter,” the first issue of which appeared in the summer of 1976. This was the first publication to unite fans of the Sony Betamax home video recorder (and later VHS, introduced in 1977). The newsletter later became “The Videophile,” a nationally distributed magazine, the last issue of which was published in 1981.

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